Category Archives: America

🎤STORY: “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin

“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, American (1850-1904)

“Great care was taken to break to her as gently as possible the news of her husband’s death.”

I have read Kate Chopin’s short story, “The Story of an Hour,” many times, every time with the same “wild abandonment” as Louise Mallard, the story’s protagonist. I pretend not to have read it before, relishing each word with fresh eyes and an open mind, yet preparing myself for the shocking, realistic ending. I am in awe of Chopin’s skill in drawing me into Mrs. Mallard’s life, even for an hour, taking me on an emotional and psychological roller-coaster ride.

When the story opens, we learn of Mrs. Mallard’s heart trouble, her sister Josephine’s “veiled hints,” and her husband’s friend, Richards, “bearing the sad message.”  After weeping on her sister’s shoulder, Mrs. Mallard retires to her room alone. She sits in an armchair in front of an open window.

“She could see in the open square before her house the tops of trees that were all aquiver with the new spring life. The delicious breath of rain was in the air. In the street below, a peddler was crying his wares. The notes of a distant song which some one was singing reached her faintly, and countless sparrows were twittering in the eaves.”

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🎤🎥NOVEL: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

NOVEL: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, American (1926 – Present)

“Atticus said to Jem one day, ‘I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’  That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. ‘Your father’s right,’ she said. ‘Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’

Imagine my surprise to learn that Harper Lee, the author of one of the greatest 20th century American classics, To Kill a Mockingbird, is to publish a new book, Go Set a Watchman, on July 14th, 2015.  It has been 55 years since Lee wrote a novel about the racism she observed as a child in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama.

Harper Lee

Harper Lee

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 

Nelle Harper Lee was the youngest of four children.  Her mother was a homemaker, and her father was a lawyer with the Alabama State Legislature.  Lee’s father once defended two African-American men (a father and son) accused of killing a storekeeper: they were tried by a jury, found guilty, and hanged. Clearly, this event had an impact on Harper Lee, for she followed in her father’s footsteps, studying law at The University of Alabama. However, she did not complete her law degree but moved to New York, obtained a job with an airline, and started writing fiction in her spare time.  She published To Kill a Mockingbird in July 1960.  It became an immediate bestseller, and she won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1961.  After her success as a writer, she assisted Truman Capote, her childhood friend (whom she based the character Dill on in Mockingbird), in researching material for his book In Cold Blood.  Lee never published another book, making the upcoming publication of Go Set a Watchman next Tuesday very exciting. Continue reading

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🎤POEM: “Travel” by Edna St. Vincent Millay

“Travel” by Edna St. Vincent Millay, American (1892-1950)

Summer is here again! – a time to visit the seaside, the mountains, or some exotic location. Wherever the destination, for me, departure day is always a joyful time.  As I close my front door, I know that whatever adventures I experience, they will change me in some small, positive way.  Perhaps, by the time I return home, I will have made a new friend, sampled a new food, or learned how to say, “Where is the nearest train station?” in another language.  I repeat to myself: lights-off, mail-stopped, windows-locked, and train tickets in my jeans pocket.  Yes, train tickets!  Like Edna St. Vincent Millay, I love traveling by train “no matter where it’s going.”

In her poem “Travel,” Millay tells us that though she hears loud voices, or lies dreaming during a still night, she is always conscious of a passing train. She hears the “engine steaming” and the “whistle shrieking.” She sees “its cinders red on the sky” (here, she refers to the old steam trains, fueled by coal). By the end of her poem, Millay admits she would take a train, regardless of its destination. I love Millay’s use of simple words and vivid imagery–the sights, the sounds of a train–as though a train were a living, breathing thing, not just carriages of cold, unfeeling metal.  Millay did not call her poem “Train.” She named it “Travel,” implying that a train, for her, is a means of escape–both physical, and mental.

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🎥SHORT STORY: “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Gilman

SHORT STORY: “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, American (1860-1935)

There are no monsters or ghosts in this story, but it is a horrifying tale nonetheless.  “The Yellow Wallpaper” describes the psychological deterioration of an upper-middle-class lady–l will call her Marianne. Marianne relates her story in her secret diary. We discover she has a vivid imagination: Her doctors describe her as having a “slight hysterical tendency.”

Marianne’s physician husband, John, “practical in the extreme,” rents a summer vacation house and installs his wife in a large attic. Marianne says, “It was a nursery first and then a playroom and gymnasium,…for the windows are barred for little children, and there are rings and things in the wall.” Did Gilman have Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre in mind where Mr. Rochester “hides” his mad wife, Bertha Mason, in the attic at Thornfield Hall?  Apparently, Marianne is not vacationing in “a colonial mansion.” It is a secluded house–perhaps an old sanitarium–rented by John to hide her “temporary nervous depression” from relatives.  Marianne writes, “So I take phosphates and tonics…and air, and exercise, and I am absolutely forbidden to ‘work’ until I am well again.” John’s opposition to “more society and stimulus” contributes to Marianne’s mental unrest, loneliness, and final deterioration.  She begins her secret diary to “relieve her mind.” What does she write about?: Her husband, her illness, and her room–specifically, the yellow wallpaper. Continue reading

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🎥PLAY: A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, American (1930-1965)

imageI have just finished reading one of the most poignant, heartrending, and honest plays ever written by an American playwright: A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry.  It is the story of an American family’s courageous struggle against racial discrimination in post-World War II Chicago.

When the play opens, we meet the Younger family: the elderly Lena Younger, her daughter Beneatha, son Walter Lee, Walter Lee’s wife Ruth, and their young son Travis.  They all share a clean but cramped apartment, filled with worn-out furniture.  We learn that Lena, a widow in her 60’s, is waiting for her husband’s $10,000 life insurance check.  The excitement builds as each family member tries to influence Lena on how to spend her money. Continue reading

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SHORT STORY: “Why I Live at the P.O.” By Eudora Welty

“Why I Live at the P.O.” by Eudora Welty, American (1909-2001)

WeltyThis morning, I perused my collection of Penguin 60s Classics on my dresser, trying to decide which little gem I would take to the coffee shop.  Penguin published these 5″ x  4″ paperbacks in 1995 to celebrate their 60th anniversary.  These little books represent the best of short fiction and non-fiction, and they are so small and light, you can pop one into your pocket to fill those dull moments while standing in line at the grocery store.  This morning, I chose “Why I Live at the P.O.” by Eudora Welty. Continue reading

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